The Perfect Pandemic Pivot

I have given several webinars over the past few weeks on leading during a crisis and one of the topics I like to discuss is making a pivot. Once you understand how this pandemic affects your team, your organization, and your industry, you need to chart a new course.

But – and this is really important – you need to stay true to your mission.

If you pivot, you need to stay true to your mission. Click To Tweet

Let me give you an example.

You’ve probably heard of the company, Life is Good.

It’s a lifestyle brand founded in 1994 and is best known for optimistic T-shirts and hats, many of which feature a smiling stick figure named Jake.

It’s probably not surprising to learn their mission is to “spread the power of optimism.”

I’ve watched them make a pivot during this COVID crisis and you can see it too. On the front page of their website, every T-shirt is related to the global pandemic but in a hopeful, optimistic, and positive approach.

For example, you can get a shirt with golden retrievers on a Zoom call or Sasquatch as the social distance world champion.

They call these shirts, “lighthearted tees for uncertain times,” and they are consistent with their mission to spread the power of optimism even in a global pandemic.

You might be thinking, that’s great Jon but I don’t own an optimistic T-shirt company, how can I make a pivot?

Good question!

I recently had Philip Freeman as a guest on my podcast. He is the founder of Murphy’s Naturals, a company that manufactures natural products for outdoor living – think bug repellent. I wanted to have him on the podcast because of the pivot he made in his business.

And…how it was entirely consistent with his mission statement.

Murphy’s Naturals’ mission is to celebrate nature and inspire good through quality natural products. They believe in “doing others good.”

During this pandemic, Philip quickly realized the world desperately needed hand sanitizer and he had the assets and people who could produce this essential product.

So, he and his company made a pivot and began to manufacture hand sanitizer.

But not just for any customer either. Philip’s company ended up becoming a supplier to the U.S. Navy who desperately needed this essential product.

And true to the company’s mission, Murphy’s Naturals’ hand sanitizer is 99.99% natural.

Inspiring good through quality natural products is not just a mission statement in a dusty binder on a shelf for Murphy’s Naturals, it’s something that is lived every day, even in a global pandemic.

A mission statement is something that is lived every day, even in a global pandemic. Click To Tweet

So, what about your organization? What pivot are you considering or have you done already?

More importantly – is it consistent with your mission?

Pivoting in a crisis is important but pivoting with a purpose is absolutely critical to maintaining your company’s authenticity.

The Power of Passion and Perseverance

As we enter our 5th week in quarantine, I’m reminded of the famous motivational posters produced by the British government in 1939 in preparation for World War II. The words were simple but the message was powerful:

“Keep Calm and Carry On.”

It’s a great message for all of us today.

The COVID crisis is clearly testing our resolve.

One thing I have noticed though…some people are handling it better than others.

And it got me thinking.

Why do some people thrive while others falter in tough times?

What is it that allows certain individuals to endure the toughest challenges without wavering?

Psychologist Angela Duckworth set out to understand this. She studied cadets at West Point. She wanted to be able to pinpoint the one thing that predicted whether or not a cadet would make it through “Beast Barracks,” the grueling seven-week initiation program.

What she discovered was groundbreaking.

She learned that endurance wasn’t predicted by SAT scores, GPA, athletics, race, gender, or social status. The most important trait for success in difficult times was “grit.”

The most important trait for success in difficult times is grit. Click To Tweet

Duckworth defines grit as “passion and sustained persistence applied toward long-term achievement.” It’s about having such a strong passion for your goals that you are willing to withstand any hardship to achieve them.

Someone who exemplifies grit in action is Gretchen Smith. Gretchen is the founder and leader of Code of Vets. Code of Vets is a charity that helps military veterans in crisis.

Gretchen’s passion for veterans and her dogged persistence to overcome countless challenges has led to one of the most powerful grass-roots organizations in the country. She has an army of volunteers who will drop everything to come to the rescue of veterans in need. In her first year in operation, she raised more than $800,000 of which 99% of the donations went directly to veterans.

She is a powerful force for good who leads with passion and persistence. Listen to my interview with her on the latest episode of the Deep Leadership Podcast.

Grit is about having such a strong passion for your goals that you are willing to withstand any hardship to achieve them. Click To Tweet

To support her efforts, especially during this COVID crisis, I recently announced that 100% of the proceeds of the sale of my book, I Have the Watch, will go directly to Code of Vets from April 20-26, 2020.

We did this last year and raised more than $1,000 for this important charity.

So, buy a book and help a Vet! Go to IHAVETHEWATCH.COM to order.

Please share this with all the leaders and future leaders in your circle of influence so we help military veterans during this crisis.

 

(U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Abe McNatt)

Who’s Your Chief?

When I was just 23 years old, fresh out of submarine school, I was given my first leadership job.

I was assigned to lead the team of sailors who maintained and operated the complex systems that controlled the nuclear reactor on the USS Tennessee. It was a small group led by a senior enlisted sailor, a Chief Petty Officer, who had come up through the ranks.

The Chief Petty Officer was not only skilled, but he was also highly experienced. He had been in the Navy for almost as many years as I had been alive. He was older than me and had infinitely more knowledge in the maintenance and operation of nuclear reactor controls. And the team looked to him for guidance.

Yet, I was in charge.

Many new leaders find themselves in this exact situation. They are asked to lead teams of older, more experienced employees.

Many new leaders find themselves in this exact situation. They are asked to lead teams of older, more experienced employees. Click To Tweet

So, how can you be an effective leader if you’re young and inexperienced? It’s simple.

Find your Chief and learn from them.

You’re probably thinking – How do I find my Chief? In the Navy it was easy but how do I find my Chief in a business environment? Look for the person in the organization who is the opinion leader. Usually, they are a senior employee and a technical expert.

Find out who the team naturally goes to for all the answers.

Find out who the team naturally goes to for all the answers. Click To Tweet

That person is your Chief.

That’s the person you want to build a relationship with and learn from. In most cases, they don’t want your job, they are happy being the senior, technical expert. If you show them respect and learn from them, you will become a more effective leader for the team.

Deep Leadership PodcastListen to my conversation with retired Chief Petty Officer, Chuck Whitworth on the latest episode of the Deep Leadership podcast to understand the important relationship between the Leader and the Chief.

And, if you need more ideas on how to be an effective leader, get a copy of my latest book – I Have the Watch: Becoming a Leader Worth Following. It’s filled with 23 practical ideas on how you can become a more effective leader.

 

Photo: USS Key West Chief of the Boat Master Chief Nicholas Harr (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kelsey J. Hockenberger)