The Responsible Leadership Podcast

The Responsible Leadership Podcast

The Responsible Leadership Podcast is a production of The Leadership Phalanx (www.leadershipphalanx.com).

What does responsible leadership look like to you? That is the foundational question of this show and the answers from my guests will help you grow as a leader. We cover mental health, women in leadership, financial well-being, cybersecurity, culture, community building, and so much more. No matter your age, sex, race, religion, sexual orientation, or any other differentiator, this podcast is here for you!

Contact Details: @ Earl@LeadershipPhalanx.com.
Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/responsible-leadership/support

All In The Same Boat W/ Jon Rennie

Jon and I examine what defines a great leader and why so many companies are lacking strong leadership. He uses examples from his time in the Navy and private business to paint a picture of what effective and motivational leadership should be. We discuss what to do if you work for a bad leader and how you can take what Jon teaches and apply it to your career, your home and your church.

All In The Same Boat W/ Jon Rennie​

All in the Same Boat: Lead Your Organization Like a Nuclear Submariner

I Have the Watch: Becoming a Leader Worth Following

I have the watch book

You Have the Watch: A Guided Journal to Become a Leader Worth Following

CONNECT WITH JON

Jon Rennie is on LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.
Subscribe to his YouTube Channel here.

Deep Leadership Episode 100: Leadership for Everyday Life with John VanDusen

Today I’m joined by John VanDusen. John is a Teacher, a Football Coach, and a Soldier. He served for 20 years in the Michigan Army National Guard with combat deployments to Iraq as a Platoon Leader, and Afghanistan as a Company Commander. He is the author of the new book Lesson 1: Leveraging Leadership in Everyday Life. In this book, John shares his experiences from the classroom, the locker room, and the battlefield and shapes them into leadership lessons that can be used in every part of your life. I’m excited to have him on the show to talk about these lessons.

John is offering 15% off a personalized copy of LESSON 1 at johnvandusen.com. Use the discount code DEEP at checkout.

Loved this episode?

Screenshot it and share it to your IG stories and tag me @jonsrennie  I would love to connect with you!

 

All in the Same Boat: Lead Your Organization Like a Nuclear Submariner

I have the watch book
I Have the Watch: Becoming a Leader Worth Following

Coffee Lover?

Visit our sponsor Bottom Gun Coffee Company use the discount code “DEEP”

CONNECT WITH JON

Jon Rennie is on LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.
Subscribe to his YouTube Channel here.

Leadership Advice for New Managers

I get this question a lot, “What leadership advice would you give to new managers?”

Honestly, being a new manager is exciting. Whether you’re a seasoned veteran in a new role or a brand new leader, everyone will be watching you.

One of the most important things I have learned in more than 30 years of leadership is that the first 100 days are critically important. This is when the new leader sets the tone for how the organization will be run under their leadership.

There is only a small window of time when you have the full attention of the workforce so your actions need to be carefully considered.

The first 100 days are critically important for new leaders. Click To Tweet

You are under a microscope and everyone is closely observing your every action. Everything you do is seen. Everything you say is dissected and discussed.

This is good news!

It means you have an opportunity to make a massive impact if you take advantage of all the attention on you in these early days.

Here are 10 activities to consider in your first 100 days in a new leadership role:

 Let your team know who you are. Every time a new leader is assigned to a team there will be anticipation. People will have concerns and expectations. It’s important to have a meeting with all team members to fully introduce yourself. Use stories and examples to let them see your character.

Get out of your office and be visible. Spend time where your people are. Actively listen to their questions, concerns, and ideas. Be open and engage them on the subjects they care about. Get to know them by asking open-ended questions. Let them get to know you as well.

Meet with key employees. Don’t assume you understand the problems and challenges facing your team. I like to have one-on-one meetings with as many people as I can. I want to know the biggest challenges and most important issues facing the organization. I also want to understand what needs to be addressed first.

Set expectations early. People want to know what you stand for. Communicate your expectations as soon as you can. Let them know what is important to you as a leader. I typically send a list of my top 10 expectations to my team in the first few weeks so they know what I expect and they don’t have to guess.

Set an example. Your minimum behaviors will be your team’s maximum performance. If you expect people to be on time, you need to be on time. If you expect managers to get out of their offices, you need to be out of your office. If you expect people to wear their safety equipment, you need to wear your safety equipment. It’s simple. Just as children follow a parent’s lead, your team will take cues from you.

Your minimum behaviors will be your team’s maximum performance. Click To Tweet

Signal your priorities. What’s important to you will be seen by your team. If you spend the first two hours of each day on your computer and not with your team, they will see that. They will assume they are not as important as your e-mail. If you concern yourself with only the inventory numbers and not the on-time delivery results, they will think you don’t care about customers.

Create a buzz. Take advantage of the early attention you have and do something to get everyone talking. Make it extreme so the message is clear. This is something I like to do. In one manufacturing plant, I had the maintenance team paint over all the signs for the reserved parking spaces for managers, including mine. The message was simple, there is no special treatment for managers. We are in this together.

Communicate with employees regularly. During a leadership transition, employees will want to know what’s going on. Will there be any organizational changes? What are your initial observations? How are things going? It’s good to send a weekly e-mail to your team to let them know what you are seeing and what they can expect. In the absence of good communications, there will be worry, speculation, and rumors.

Create the mood. We all know attitude is contagious. Regardless of how you feel, you need to be upbeat and optimistic around your team. You still need to be empathetic when you have serious issues to deal with, but if you are consistently upbeat and in good spirits, the team will demonstrate the same behaviors. In the same respect, if you are quiet, unresponsive, angry, abrasive, or sarcastic, life will quickly get sucked out of your team. Think about what mood you are conveying every time you are with employees.

Cast a vision. At the end of the first 100 days, your team’s strengths and weaknesses will be clear. You will also understand the opportunities and threats. The goal now is to communicate a clear vision for the future. Consider where you want to go and how to get there. Communicate this vision to your team in a way that is clear and concise.

Leadership in the first 100 days is an exciting time. You are under a microscope which means you have an opportunity to make a huge impact if you take advantage of all the attention on you.

 

If you are interested in learning more about how to make a lasting impact in the first 100 days, subscribe to my weekly newsletter and get a free eBook, The New Leaders Guide: 10 Steps to Making a Lasting Impact in the First 100 Days.

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[Photo by ThisisEngineering RAEng on Unsplash]